Chill: The Killing Games 2013 Review

Chill: The Killing Games 2013

aka Chill (Working Title)

Directed by: Noelle Bye, Meredith Holland

Starring: Roger Conners, Bradley Michael Arner, Kelly Rogers

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Review by Luis Joaquín González

Chill had been one of the few movies that I was really excited about getting my hands upon. Haydn Watkins, the co-author of magnificent upcoming slasher book Alone in the Dark, told me about it, so I 65657687980998766565got in touch with director Noelle Bye and she sent me over an online copy to review. At the time of writing, it boasts a 7.5 ranking on the IMDB and has been keenly anticipated amongst cult horror circles due to a 456576768798980909couple of successful pre-screenings.

Despite accusations that slasher movies are all identically structured, genre completists will note the small traits that distinguish titles by their production dates. Since about 2011, we have seen a theme of strategic multi-layered twists and revelation scenes that have appeared in the likes of Billy Club, Camp 139, Smiley, Blood Junkie and Backslasher. From what I’d heard on the grapevine about Chill, it was another that had been written with a focus on maintaining a compelling mystery.

A college in the US has become notorious due to the grim legend of a game that goes by the name of 45657687879898Chill. It involves a number of people randomly picking a piece of paper from a box and keeping what they get a secret from the other participants. Dependent on what they receive, they will either become the ‘killer’ or a ‘victim’ and it’s the killer’s job to hunt out and ‘murder’ the other players, whilst keeping his/her identity anonymous until the end. Chill was popular until about 1988, when one gamer took the whole assassin thing a bit too seriously and butchered twelve students before succumbing to a gruesome fate. Since then, the game has been outlawed on campus and it has become a part of the town’s history that they’d rather leave behind. One business-minded local thinks otherwise though and decides to revisit the scene of the original massacre and televise a new version of the game for profit. Despite resistance from some of the townsfolk, especially an over-zealous professor, the launch date goes ahead as planned. It seems that someone still has an axe to grind and before long, the youngsters are forced to pit their wits against a maniacal villain.7637638738329832982092092

Before we get going, I think it’s important that you understand one thing about Chill that’s really essential as to how you perceive it. I’d been wrapped up in the decent IMDB rating and the positivity that I’d heard and so I was expecting a slick slasher along the lines of Billy Club. It wasn’t until thirty-five minutes in that I realised this 45657676879898was in fact a micro-budget production ($3,000) and only then did I really begin to appreciate the film’s accomplishments.

You see, Chill is quite long for a slasher movie, (one hour and forty-five minutes in fact) and the first half of those are pretty unconvincing. Awkwardly acted characters in under-lit scenarios are the order of the day and I was thinking that I was going to be the first critic to put a dent in the film’s glorious reputation. There’s a lot of focus on a group of marginally-appealing personalities and they’re given dialogue that barely registers because it’s so basic and unimaginative. To offer an example, we meet a washed-up kid star who has been invited to take part in the game, but upon his arrival he is disappointed that there’s no fanfare and only one person recognises him. He’s obviously deluded as to the level of his notoriety, but it’s a joke that doesn’t need or 4545657678798989898warrant the amount of attention that it’s given by the script.

I was thinking the worst by that point, but when the games finally launch, the directors unleash a couple of really sharp and effective shock sequences. There’s nothing quite as creepy as dark dilapidated corridors and the film is nicely scored with gloomy low-chords that help maintain the morbid tone. In the earlier killings, we don’t get to see the antagonist’s bird mask clearly, but there’s a really well structured scene that introduces him with credible menace. He then goes on to slash the throat of a hapless youngster and there’s a juicy blood effect to maximise the impact. For the next half an hour, we get a tense showdown as the remaining players discover that they are locked inside the auditorium with a vicious maniac. Blood flows fluidly as people are sliced, diced and strangled, but the real suspense is delivered by the 45456576879898988776767676enigma of who it is that’s slaughtering the group. I didn’t work out the psychopath’s true identity, but I still am unsure as to whether it was a surprise or a bit of a a cheat on the audience. Either way, it successfully keeps you guessing and there’s nothing more that I could have asked for.

What I thought was really authentic was that the story was led for the most part by an openly homosexual central character. Kyle Carpenter (cool surname) does a good job of giving us a likeable protagonist and ticks many of the boxes that are stereotypically filled by a heroine. We also get a role reversal that I don’t want to reveal without giving anything away, but let’s just say that the film’s choice of survivor(s) is an uncommon piece of template realignment. It all leads to an intriguing open ending and I have heard through the same grapevine that Chill 2 is already on the cards.766565768787980909

I strongly believe that Chill is one of a number of recent entries that underline the necessity of the slasher genre as a filmaking talent pool. There truly is no better style of movie to unleash some flair and the more of these examples we get, the closer we come to a complete category rebirth. Whilst the feature itself is not without its problems (poor illumination, half-hearted dialogue, noticeably average acting, a couple of WTF revelations and it could have done with some eye candy), it gives me great pleasure to see that we have moved well away from the era of Camp Blood and Carnage Road. Nowadays low budget features are stronger than they’ve ever been and that in itself is a real achievement. Congratulations to Noelle, Meredith and Roger for a decent effort considering the budget. The gloss and invention in some of their photography was extremely impressive and I am looking forward to seeing more of their work.

Slasher Trappings:

Killer Guise: √√√√

Gore √√

Final Girl

RATING:a-slash-above-logo11a-slash-above-logo11a-slash-above-logo11

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Posted on February 21, 2015, in Slasher and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Thank you for such a great review. I always appreciate constructive criticisms when the strengths are also acknowledged. We worked our asses off on this movie and we’re shocked to see it getting as much love and attention as it is prior to its official release! Thank you for acknowledging our efforts, even on such a minor budget, and ideally you’ll have a chance to review more of our projects down the line!

    -Roger Conners
    AKA Kyle Carpenter

    • Hi Roger, to be honest I felt guilty about saying some of that when I learned of the budget, but the talent you guys have is clearly obvious and I’m indeed tracking down more of your work 🙂 Looking forward to following your careers!

  1. Pingback: Into the Woods 2006 Review | a SLASH above...

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